Setting a Garden Mood


Hymenocallis - Peruvian daffodil.
What mood does your garden induce? Get past the weeds, the overgrown paths and the bags of mulch you never got around to spreading, and look at it like you're seeing it for the first time.

My garden, no matter how messy, always brings me joy at first glance. I should savor that glance. 

My garden is full of life, courtesy of the bluebirds, catbirds, bright yellow finches, woodpeckers, hummingbirds and butterflies. I never get tired of seeing what they're up to.

My garden's purpose is to be colorful. I include nearly every hue and the pairing sometimes goes awry. Things come close to, but never reach the state of, clashing.

My garden is always fragrant--whether the scent comes from peonies or from the waxy tropical flowers of Peruvian lily or tuberoses.

Rose 'At Last' is a beautiful peachy color. Its fragrance is just a little on the fruitily-rosie side.

Peruvian daffodil (Hymenocallis) grows so quickly, it's best to stagger their planting, but I know if I put some bulbs aside, I'll forget them or forget where I put them.

Tuberoses are worth the wait. And it's not really a pretty wait. I put them in pots so I can overwinter them in the garage. Until they bloom, the foliage is boring.

My garden's shady spots are painted with large swathes of color so they can be appreciated from afar. Aralia 'Sun King' grabs the first glance, but Hydrangea 'Blue Billow' share the shady spotlight.

My garden has several cannas in containers this year, all but one grown from the roots sent to me by Anthony Tesselaar Plants. Out of  three varieties, Tropicanna Black is the strongest grower.

I see cannas as foliage plants with the flowers just a bonus. The hummingbirds see them that way as well. Canna 'Tropicanna Black' holds its own with Amaranthus love lies bleeding.

My garden offers up the biggest plants at the same time it gets too hot and humid to spend much time working in the garden. And that's why we have windows.




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